How to Make a Mask Using Tin Foil and Tape

A perfect mask can be made using surprisingly few products that can be found at home: tin foil and tape. Not only is this mask incredibly simple to make, but the tin foil enables it to perfectly fit your face. Once the mask is made, there are so many possible characters it can be adapted to.

How to Make a Mask With Tin Foil and Tape

Step 1: Overlap 3 sheets of aluminum foil in a stack.

How to Make a Mask With Tin Foil and Tape

Step 2: Push the stack of sheets onto your face. Push down as hard as you are comfortable pushing. Do it carefully, so the foil does not become punctured. (It might be useful to have a helper do this part.)

How to Make a Mask With Tin Foil and Tape

Step 3: Check you have the general outline of your face imprinted: nose, lips, corners of your eyes and cheekbones. Use a marker and trace around your eyes (it might be good to follow the bones around your eye socket) for where you want to place the eye holes in your mask. Also, trace around anything else you want cut out. (Breathing holes are useful for breathing!)you might also want to cut a hole for talking too.

How to Make a Mask With Tin Foil and Tape

Step 4: Carefully remove the foil from your face. Cut with sharp scissors around the edges of the mask. And note––once you cut it, you can’t really go back easily, so leave extra.

How to Make a Mask With Tin Foil and Tape

Step 5: Carefully cut out the eyes. Do this either by puncturing the foil with a toothpick and tearing the foil out, or snipping in the center of the area with the tip of scissors and folding the foil back.

How to Make a Mask With Tin Foil and Tape

Step 6: Cut holes or slots in the side of your mask. These are for the ribbons/cord/shoelaces to attach the mask to your face.

How to Make a Mask With Tin Foil and Tape

Step 7: Cut small sections of tape. While pressing the mask to your face to keep the features strong, gently place the tape onto your mask. When you feel the mask’s features are firm enough, place all the sections of tape, overlapping, across all visible places of foil, including the back (foil is itchy next to the skin).

How to Make a Mask With Tin Foil and Tape

Step 8: Tie the cord to the holes in the side of your mask. Leave enough length to both wrap around your head, and to tie in a nice knot or bow.

How to Make a Mask With Tin Foil and Tape

Step 9: Decorate using acrylic paints. Paint whatever you want, making sure to leave it to dry out of the way of people or pets. 

Paint completely black for the ideal Ninja disguise, or add colorful paints and sequins for a masquerade ball!  You can also add things like horns, a pointed nose, or antlers by simply making the form with tin foil, and covering with tape like what you did in the previous steps.  Become whatever character you’d like in a few easy steps!

The instructional portion of this article was provided by wikihow, a wiki building the world’s largest, highest quality how-to manual. Please edit this article and find author credits at the original wikiHow article on How To Make A Mask Out of Tin Foil and Tape  Content on wikiHow can be shared under a Creative Commons License.

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A Modern Resurgence of Vintage Pastimes

As the buzz over the technology revolution is settling down and becoming less of a novelty, the past couple of years have seen a resurgence of vintage, or traditional pastimes.  The world keeps spinning faster, and everyone’s eyes seem to be opening to the need for relaxation.  Gone are the days of the glorification of “busy”.  They are being replaced with the art of slow living.

The Resurgence of Vintage Pastimes

One of the most popular vintage pastimes that’s resurfaced seems to be whittling.  What do you think of when you picture whittling?  Perhaps what pops up in your head is an old man in a rocking chair on a front porch, carving a piece of wood, with an ice-cold beverage nearby.  His grandson sits in a chair next to him whittling his own stick of wood, keeping up a steady stream of chatter.  As the sun sinks lower in the sky, their wood pieces start to come to life.  The scene is idyllic, peaceful, and relaxing.

The history of whittling really begins in early Americana.  With only the use of a pocket knife and good, soft wood; crafty folks could whittle just about anything.  A couple of main things that have changed with the pastime since then is the quality of the knives and the selection of specialty blade shapes available.  The craft has become easier and more enjoyable than ever before.

If you’re looking for a way to wind down after a busy day, or to connect with your children or grandchildren, your search is over.  JMCremps has a large selection of knives, thumb guards, whittling & woodcarving books, and kits to get you started or keep you going with one of the best hobbies out there.

What are you waiting for?  Throw away your worries for a moment so you can sit back and relax while creating something beautiful.  Spend some quality time with someone you love. Connect with the past while living fully in the present.  There’s a reason this pastime is coming back, and I think if you give it a try you just might become an advocate of the art of slow living.

Easy Science Project: How To Make a Bouncy Egg

Are you in need of a simple science project that only requires a few household ingredients?  Look no further!  Parents are always telling children not to play with their food, but they’ll make an exception on this one.  Try this fun experiment that turns an egg into a bouncy ball!  The only ingredients required are an egg or two, some vinegar, and a container.

Easy Science Project - How to Make a Bouncy Egg

Step 1: Get a container of vinegar ready. Find a jar or Tupperware container large enough to fit the egg. Grab a bottle of regular white vinegar and fill the jar or Tupperware container with vinegar. Don’t fill it all the way to the brim though, because then putting the egg in will make it overflow.

Step 2: Add dye if you want to color your bouncy egg. You can easily make your finished bouncy egg any color you want to by adding food coloring dye to the vinegar. Just add around 10 drops of the dye to the vinegar, or enough to color the whole container of vinegar.

  • It doesn’t have to be filled to the top but it should be filled high enough so that the egg can be completely submerged in vinegar.

Easy Science Project - How to Make a Bouncy Egg

Step 3: Submerge an egg. Get a raw, unboiled egg. Place the raw egg in the vinegar-filled container. Just drop it in from right above the vinegar so the vinegar doesn’t splash everywhere. Make sure it is completely submerged.

Easy Science Project - How to Make a Bouncy Egg

Step 4: Cover the container. Place a lid on your container and leave it somewhere safe but out of the sun. The less sunlight it gets the better, so either put it somewhere dark like a closet, or cover it with something like a kitchen cloth.

Easy Science Project - How to Make a Bouncy Egg

Step 5: Wait for the shell of the egg to completely dissolve. This process can take anywhere from 24 to 72 hours. To be on the safe side, wait three days before continuing.

Easy Science Project - How to Make a Bouncy Egg

Step 6: Check the egg. Look at the egg through the container every once and a while to check its progress. The egg will turn a transparent color because the eggshell is decreasing in thickness. The eggshell will soon dissolve, leaving a thick strong egg white.

  • The reason the shell dissolves is because vinegar is a weak acid. The egg shell is made of calcium carbonate. When the shell meets vinegar, it makes a chemical reaction that turns the calcium carbonate into carbon dioxide, which is what those bubbles in the container are.

Step 7: Remove the egg. Take the egg out of the vinegar carefully. Just reach in and pull it out with your hand. Don’t forget to wash your hand afterwards. Place the egg on a couple of paper towels to let it drain.

  • Be extra careful when handling a raw bouncy egg. It will be more fragile than a boiled bouncy egg.

Easy Science Project - How to Make a Bouncy Egg

Step 8: Bounce it. Make sure it’s dry first. You can speed this up by drying it by hand with a paper towel. Be careful not to drop it from too high of a height, as it can still break and leave a mess. Start with just a few inches, and have cleaning supplies ready!

If you enjoyed this project and are looking for more science-related entertainment, be sure to check out jmcremps.com for a great selection of science kits, science books, and loads of other fun, exciting, and educational items!

The instructional portion of this article was provided by wikihow, a wiki building the world’s largest, highest quality how-to manual. Please edit this article and find author credits at the original wikiHow article on How To Make A Bouncy Egg. Content on wikiHow can be shared under a Creative Commons License.

How to Build the Perfect Snow Fort for Kids

Winter is full swing, and for many of you, the snow banks are piled high.  The holidays are over, school is back in session, and spring seems a million years off.  About now, cabin fever may be setting in.  The kids are tired of playing outside, and you’re tired of the kids playing inside.  This is the time to kick-up the outdoor fun a notch and show your kids how to build the best snow fort on the block.  Show them how to do it right, do it safely, and to do it with some style.  The next thing you know, you’ll be serving hot chocolate in the fort instead of the kitchen!

This simple video, narrated by kids and made for kids, shows you just how easy it is to build a basic snow fort:

NOTE:  It is important to remember to make sure that they maintain the thickness of the ceiling as the video explains, and that they do not make the entrances and tunnels too wide.  Inserting painter’s sticks in the ceiling is an excellent way to make sure that the fort stays strong and won’t collapse.

If they don’t want to build a fort with tunnels and would rather build the fort so that it has an open top, then the JM Cremp’s Snowball and Snow Brick Maker will be their best friend.  Pack the snow in the mold, place the bricks in a staggered formation one on top of the other, remove the mold, and voila! The next thing you know there will be a fort the size of the Alamo in your yard!  If you’re not a kid, you may be asking, “What’s the advantage to an open-topped fort?”  Snowball fights of course!

The Snowball and Brick Maker will make quick work out of fort-building and snowball making.
The Snowball and Brick Maker will make quick work out of fort-building and snowball making.

Whether their fort is small or large, simple or grand, one thing is for certain – they’ll enjoy hours of entertainment and loads of fun.

As always, JM Cremp’s is your ultimate source for adventure toys and gear, outdoor fun, and family activities.  If you don’t already have their catalog, request one today!

An Interactive History of D-Day

June 6 marks the anniversary of that fated day that began the campaign of the liberation of Nazi-controlled Europe and brought the long-planned Operation Overlord into play.  It also marked the beginning of the end of the war that started for most Americans with the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.  The Allied invasion of the beaches of Normandy in France was the largest seaborne invasion in history and came to be known as D-Day.  Planning for this operation began the year before and proved to be the crucial turning point in the war in Europe.  Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower called the operation a crusade in which, “we will accept nothing less than full victory.”  Although victory did not come easy, nor did it come without significant cost, it did eventually come.

The naval invasion fleet included 1,213 warships, 4,126 landing craft of various types, 736 ancillary craft, and 864 merchant vessels.  More than 13,000 aircraft supported the invasion including over 2,200 British and American bombers.  Nearly 160,000 troops crossed the English Channel on that fateful day with over 10,000 casualties logged and 4,414 brave men and boys having given their lives.

This important day in history is memorialized in an informative and interactive way online by visiting the US Army’s official D-Day website.  You can listen to Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower’s speech to the troops reminding them that, “The eyes of the world are upon you,” before they embarked on ” a great crusade.”  You can also learn what the “D” in D-Day stands for.

normandyFor the younger generation, the book Normandy, A Graphic History of D-Day tells the intricate story of the planning and execution of Operation Overlord from the invasion of five D-Day beaches (Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno, and Sword) on June 6, 1944, to the liberation of Paris on August 25, 1944. In between, Vansant paints a portrait of the campaign’s vicious and unforgiving fighting, including the Allies’ capture of Cherbourg, the deadly battles in hedgerow country, the Allied struggle for Caen, the breakout of Patton’s Third Amy, and the eventual defeat of Axis forces in the Falaise Pocket. It was the Allied success in Normandy that hastened the beginning of the end for the Nazis.

However you choose to teach your children about this day isn’t as important as the fact that you are teaching them about this very important day.  It is a day in the history of the world where men and women of many nations, religions, and races came together with a single-minded purpose to defeat a common enemy.  It is the story of good vs. evil and triumph over tragedy.  It is a story that must be told for many generations to come.

 

3 Simple Tips to Break Your Boy’s Technology Addiction

Are you part of the generation that remembers when a few old blankets were the makings of a perfect hideout, and the most drama you had to deal with was whether to play army or cowboys?  If you are, then it can be quite a challenge to see your perfectly healthy son curled up on his bed with his iPod in hand in the middle of a beautiful summer afternoon.  Believe me, I feel your pain!

A 2010 Kaiser Foundation Study found that children and teens on average spend almost 8 hours each day on entertainment media.  The naked truth is that technology is here for the long haul, and your child’s love of it isn’t going to go away anytime soon.  Fortunately, there are some simple things that you can do to break your boy’s addiction to electronics and rekindle their adventurous spirit.

First, encourage them to explore those things that interest them, and to do so in a hands-on manner.  If your child loves science, then get him an simple science experiment kit, and let him learn first hand.  If he loves bugs, get him a bug magnifying glass and let him get down and dirty in the mud.  If it’s a fascination with the outdoors, then a basic survival book and a Pocket Tool will be the beginning of a life-long love of the outdoors.   It’s been proven that on the whole boys thrive when they can learn by “doing”, and there’s no better time to start than when they are young and full of curiousity.

The second thing you can do to inspire your child’s love of learning and adventure through stories.  Inspiring true stories such as Eyewitness: The American Revolution or The Civil War Graphic Novel 2-Book Set can inspire your children to do and achieve more than they ever thought possible.  Fictional stories about heroes and warriors can broaden teach them to dream big and reach for their goals.

Third, be a good example.  Be active yourself so the next time you encourage your couch potato to get outside and explore the world they live it they can’t say, “But you never do!” Better yet, be active and learn together as a family.  Take the time for a family hike or an afternoon together at your local historical society.  Whatever your chosen activity, use it as an opportunity to learn and grow together as a family.  A love of adventure may start when you are young, but a true adventurous spirit never withers.

To find thousands of ways to inspire a passion for learning and to ignite an adventurous spirit within your boys, visit www.jmcremps.com.  Request their FREE Adventure Guide Catalog today, and you’ll discover why over 100,000 families rely on JM Cremp’s as their go-to resource for hands-on activites for busy boys, ideas & toys to enhance active imaginations, fun gear for outdoor adventures, parenting resources, and educational tools for creative learning.

A Backyard Waterpark for Kids – Make Your Own Slip and Slide in 6 Easy Steps

Just because summer is winding down, doesn’t mean you can’t squeeze in a lot of summer fun before the leaves change color.  A homemade slip and slide is easy to set up and is a blast for the whole family.  Set it up at your next family gathering and watch the laughter ensue!

Step 1.  Plastic sheeting. If you don’t already have a roll of plastic sheeting they are easy to find at the nearest hardware store.  The ideal size is a standard 10 x 100 foot (3 x 30 meter) roll of plastic sheeting.

  • Look for sheeting in the paint supply section. You should be able to find a sufficient roll for $5-30 USD.[1]
  • You may find rolls of various lengths available; have a slipping-and-sliding space in mind while you’re making your purchase, and try to buy a roll that will fit that space. If you’re just using a backyard, 20-30 feet should suffice; if you’ll be using a large, grassy hill, or a public park, you may plan for a 50-foot, 100-foot, or 200-foot slide. Remember that you can always fold the sheet over if it’s too long or too wide, and you can always tape the ends of two sheets together to make an extra-long slide.
  • Find the thickest plastic that you can. The sheet should be at least 4-6 feet wide–broad enough that you won’t slide off halfway down the slide. As a rough rule of thumb: the longer the slide, the wider it should be.
  • You may also consider using a standard tarp, although most tarps may not be long enough for a quality slide. If you’re setting up a slide in your yard, then a large tarp should suffice. Tarps tend to be thicker and sturdier than plastic sheeting, but they’re also much more expensive. Find the longest, thinnest tarp that you can.

Step 2. Choose your sliding location. You’ll need a large, soft, grassy area, preferably on a slope. Consider building a slide on the beach. Make sure that you’ll be able to access a water supply.

  • Make sure to choose a spot where you won’t run into a driveway, a road, or any trees. Check for obstacles in the path of the slide: potholes in the grass, small bushes or stumps, or rocks that could be painful to a slider. Avoid all potential hazards.
  • A grassy, gently-sloped hill is ideal, if you can find one. The steeper the hill, the faster you’ll go–and the more likely that you’ll take a tumble off the slide on the way down! Carefully consider who will be riding this slide. If you’re making a slide for young children, choose a shorter, flatter run–a gentle, grassy backyard is perfect. If you’re a teenager or an adult making a slide for other teenagers or adults, feel free to chase the adrenaline and pick the biggest hill you can find. Slide at your own risk.
  • Make sure that the end of slide is safe, soft, and flat. Ideally, your slip-and-slide should run out onto a long, grassy lawn. You’ll be coming down the slide pretty quickly, so be sure that you have plenty of room to land. Keep the end of the run far away from potentially painful surfaces: rocks, sidewalks, roads, walls. Consider running the slide out into a body of water: a pool, a pond, or a river.
  • Always have an adult confirm that the space is safe to use. Better safe than sorry!

Step 4. Find a water supply. You’ll need to keep the slide constantly lubricated to ensure a smooth and slippery sliding experience.

  • If you’re setting up the slide in the yard of your house, you can just use a standard garden hose. If you have any sort of spigot attachments–a spray hose, for instance–feel free to use it for more control.
  • If you’re slipping and sliding away from home–say, on a grassy hill, or in a public park–look around for a spigot. If you can find a spigot, then consider bringing a hose from home to hook up, but be aware that your community may frown upon you tapping into the municipal water supply.  Make sure you get permission before doing so!
  • If you’re away from home and you can’t find a spigot, then you’ll need to supply your own water. Bring a few buckets, and fill them up with water at the nearest tap. Pour out the water at the top of the slide and let it run down. Return to the tap to refill as needed. Your supply is low, so you shouldn’t pour the water out until right before someone rides the slide.

Step 4.  Roll out the plastic sheeting. When you’re ready to set up the slide, spread your sheeting out over the sliding run.

  • Make sure that the sheeting is as straight as possible. Smooth out any wrinkles. Align the course along the natural slope of the hill. You will start at the top (or on the hillside) and end up at the bottom.
  • Fold the sheeting as needed to get the size and shape that you want. If you want a narrower slide, stick to 4-6 feet wide. If you prefer a wider slide, leave the sheeting as wide as you bought it. Use your best judgement, and above all make the slide safe.
  • Remember: the longer the slide, the more time you’ll have to tumble off the sides, especially if you start sliding at an angle. Consider leaving the slide wide for extra-long sheets.
  • Consider holding the sheet taut, with one person holding each corner in the air, in order to ensure that it’s been completely unfurled.

Step 5.  Anchor the sheet to the ground. You want to slip and slide on the slip-and-slide, but you don’t want the slip-and-slide to slip and slide around while you’re slipping and sliding. This is especially important for longer slides and slides on hills.

  • Use metal stakes or tent pegs to hold the corners in place. You may want to stake down the edges of longer slides, at intervals, to ensure that everything stays where it should.
  • You can use heavy objects to weigh down the corners of the slide, but don’t use anything that will injure you if you run into at a high speed. Buckets and plastic containers (filled with water for weight) are good; chairs are good; anything that you can knock over without hurting yourself is good; anything soft but dense (like a hay bale) is good. Cinderblocks, heavy rocks, and bricks are not good; sharp objects are not good; anything that you wouldn’t want to smash against your face is not good.
  • Make sure that the slide is secured in place. Once people start sliding down the sheet, it will shift around and bunch up into itself unless you’ve stretched it taut. If you plan ahead, you’ll save yourself the trouble of pausing the fun to adjust it later.
  • A smoother slide is a safer slide. If the sheet bunches up, wrinkles, and shifts around, the water won’t flow smoothly, and riders will be more likely to tumble off-course. This is especially true of long slides.

Step 6.  Spray the slide with water. If you have access to a hose, use a hose. If you don’t, use a bucket to carry water to the slide. The larger the slide, the more water you’ll need.

  • Make sure to soak the entire length of the slide. If your slide lies on a slope, you can leave a hose running at the top so that a continuous stream of water courses down the sheet. You can do the same thing with a bucket, but be sparing if you’re working with a limited supply.
  • If you aren’t running a hose continuously–whether it’s a conscious effort to preserve water, or just because you’re using a bucket–try to splash the slide directly before someone takes a ride. Make sure that the slide is consistently wet, from top to bottom. It’s most important that the slide is wet at its beginning end.
  • Consider adding a few cups of soap or detergent to the water, or pouring soap at the head of the slide. You can also use, say, bubble bath. The detergent will mix with the water and make for a delightfully slippery experience. Be careful not to get any soap in your eyes; consider wearing goggles in particularly soapy situations.
  • If you’re sliding in the rain, wait for the downpour to thoroughly drench the plastic sheeting. If it’s wet and slick, you should be good to go. Be aware the rain might make for a muddy situation.
  • Test out the slide Have a responsible person give the tarp a few test runs, just to be sure that it’s safe. Make sure that there’s plenty of room to stop at the end of the slide. Once you’re given the go-ahead: limber up. It’s time to slip and slide!

Now you’re ready to slip and slide and have a great time!  But before you do, remember these important safety tips:

  • Before you slide, make sure that there’s no one standing, sitting, or laying in the way. Look out for rocks, pavement, and other potentially painful surfaces. It’s better to take a spill into the grass than to run into someone else at full speed.
  • After you ride as far as you can go, get off the slide quickly to make way for the next slider. If it’s a long slide, and the next slider can’t tell whether you’ve gotten off, yell “All clear!” to give the go-ahead.

Enjoy your homemade slip and slide during the last warm days of the summer season.  If you want some fun accessories and other great water toys to go with your new backyard watermark, then check out these best sellers from JM Cremps:

The Aquazooka Utlimate Water Blaster –  This awesome water cannon will shoot up to 60 feet!

The 3 Water Person Balloon Launcher – This is really a boy’s dream come true.  The distance and accuracy at which  both water balloons and snowballs can be launched will blow their minds.

The Wabobo Extreme Water Ball – Yes, it’s a weird name, but the Waboba Extreme is America’s favorite water ball.  This ball is designed to bounce off of the water which makes it extremely fun in the pool or at the lake.

The instructional portion of this article was provided by wikiHow, a wiki building the world’s largest, highest quality how-to manual.  How to Make a Slip and Slide: 8 Steps (with pictures). Content on wikiHow can be shared under a Creative Commons License.

Children Learn What They Live

In 1954, American writer and family counselor Dorothy Law Nolte wrote a poem on child rearing for the Torrance Herald.  The poem was titled “Children Learn What They Live”.  The poem resonated with parents so much that it was even distributed to millions of new parents by a baby formula company.  The popularity of that poem hasn’t died away, and for very good reason.  The words and message are as relevant today as they ever were, and they serve as a good reminder to us all on how to lead by example.

Children are what they learn, so a little love and patience goes a long way!
Children are what they learn, so a little love and patience goes a long way!

If a child lives with criticism,
he learns to condemn.

If a child lives with hostility,
he learns to fight.

If a child lives with fear,
he learns to be apprehensive.

If a child lives with pity,
he learns to feel sorry for himself.

If a child lives with ridicule,
he learns to be shy.

If a child lives with jealousy,
he learns what envy is.

If a child lives with shame,
he learns to feel guilty.

If a child lives with encouragement,
he learns to be confident.

If a child lives with tolerance,
he learns to be patient.

If a child lives with praise,
he learns to be appreciative.

If a child lives with acceptance,
he learns to love.

If a child lives with approval,
he learns to like himself.

If a child lives with recognition,
he learns that it is good to have a goal.

If a child lives with sharing,
he learns about generosity.

If a child lives with honesty and fairness,
he learns what truth and justice are.

If a child lives with security,
he learns to have faith in himself and in those about him.

If a child lives with friendliness,
he learns that the world is a nice place in which to live.

If you live with serenity,
your child will live with peace of mind.

-Dorothy Law Nolte

The Ultimate Summer Fun Checklist

Summer days are here again!  Once the novelty of no-school wears off, don’t let boredom set in.  JM Cremp’s has a Summer Fun Checklist that will keep the kids busy and mom happy.  Best of all, these great ideas are interactive and can be fun for the whole family.

Obstacle Course for Kids -Summer Adventures
A backyard obstacle course is a perfect way to keep your adventurous boys happy!

Tonka Trucks – Making Dreams Come Alive for Over 60 Years

Are you a truck lover?  Does your heart beat a little faster at the sight of four-wheel drive machine?  It’s ok, mine does too.  For us truck fanatics, our love of trucks didn’t start when we got our driver’s license.  It started when we were kids playing on the floor, making engine sounds, and pushing around a mighty Tonka Truck that was almost as big as we were.

Tonka Trucks
Tonka Trucks allow kids to be heroes and to dream big.

What’s so special about a Tonka Truck?  It isn’t just their construction (although they can last for generations), it isn’t only their realistic design, and it isn’t just their true-to-life detailing.  Tonka trucks are so beloved because they allow boys and girls to dream and to dream big. When a six-year old is playing with a Tonka firetruck, he’s not just playing with his truck.  At that moment, he’s a heroic fireman rescuing strangers from a burning building.  When you see a toddler pushing around a bulldozer, he’s not just pushing it.  He’s in that truck, pushing dirt and building himself a racetrack.  A little boy pushing a tractor in the driveway is, at that moment, a farmer in charge of the biggest farm in the midwest.

The reason that Tonka trucks are still popular after 60 plus years is because they allow children to become heroes, dream big, and to create their own grand adventures.  Whether it’s a Tow Truck, a Tonka Dump Truck, or a Steel Bulldozer – your child or grandchild is sure to get years of dream building and epic adventures out of their Tonka Truck.